A New Story

Pop Lit Fiction

We like stories!

We like stories which are unpredictable in plot, point-of-view, and theme– such as our new feature, “Churchgoing in New England” by Richard Greenhorn. We’re on a quest for new kinds of stories– those outside the customary in ideas and viewpoint.

What should any short story accomplish?

The tale should convey knowledge and experience; emotion and meaning. It should carry the reader along then finish with surprise, insight, or impact. Something. See if this story fulfills those requirements.

One-time department stores and groceries had been replaced by specialty winter supply shops, novelty bookstores, a few adult boutiques, and an over-priced Leftist drinking establishment called The People’s Pub. On the town commons across the street were the placards and banners left over from this morning’s protest. . .

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ALSO: Stay up-to-date with the All-Time American Writers Tournament.
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(Painting: “A New England Town” by Middleton Manigault.)

 

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Prince and the Populist Moment

Essay

AS we weren’t able to get anything from our pipeline ready in time to post today, I’ve knocked out a quick essay I believe is timely.

It also addresses a thought which has been in my head of late– that we have to stop dividing ourselves. Naïve? Maybe. In this tumultuous year of 2016, too many of us treat ideology like religion. We put party and identity before country. We’re unable to compromise on anything.

Pop is populism, but how do we define that?

Rock at its outset was a populist outbreak. It was scorned by politicians, intellectuals and the academy, who are always five steps behind the times.

K.W.

 

Baseball Is Truth, Truth Is Baseball

Uncategorized

Hello! To celebrate the classic American summer sport of baseball– and the All-Star Game on July 14th– we present to readers what may well be a modern classic by Tom Tolnay,  “Baseball Is Truth, Truth Is Baseball.”

Is it a story?

Is it an essay?

Read it and decide. We believe you’ll find in the tale a great deal of insight and meaning.

What I’m saying is this:  Baseball’s a thinking fan’s game, and understanding its subtleties requires an upper-deck level of intelligence as opposed to, say, eyeballing a horde of foul-ball twits (or should I say “twitters”) in leggings kicking an air-pumped ball hither and thither.