Scenes from a Scary Novel

Pop Fiction

Happy Halloween! We find ourselves without a new Halloween story to present to you– so we dug up from a literary crypt fragments of an unfinished slasher novel, like cut-up pieces of a corpse. The original idea was that the intellectual parts of the novel would be scarier than the scary parts. It’s about a city, a mayor, and his wife, and staff, and a series of murders with which they’re confronted. Read the excerpts here.

The resurrected novel notes anyway are an apt prelude to NaNoWriMo (National Novel Writing Month) which kicks off November 1st. We’ll be doing a presentation for NaNoWriMo in the Detroit area– more info to follow .

The finely-sharpened hunting knife filled the killer’s vision. Staring at the edge of the knife intoxicated him. The image carried resonances of barbarism. Violence and blood. To his warped mind, the killings were necessary, but they’d also become fun.

The Cutest Cat That Ever Lived!

Pop Fiction

We’re authentic. Our roots are in the DIY zine scene. It’s why we occasionally publish stories from one of the best underground zine writers in America, “Fishspit.”

Also, we’re shameless. We enjoy promoting this site. We can’t help noticing the love for cats across the Internet. Cats are a pop phenomenon. We want in on it.

What happens when you cross a tough underground writer with a cat?

You get “The Cutest Cat That Ever Lived.”

Is it “Literature” with a capital L? We don’t know! But it is entertaining. And authentic. And heartwarming. Especially if you like cats!

I’ve seen thousands of kittens. I’ve volunteered at countless cat rescue shelters . . . so you know I’ve seen cats in my life. I grew up on a farm where at any given time there were 17-23 cats. I have seen cats! I guarantee you Pip was the cutest kitten that ever existed. Don’t you even try to tell me your kitten is cuter.

Tunnel Vision

Pop Fiction

What happens when you mix homeless veterans, a subway system, and a shady-but-not-all-bad lawyer?

Our new tale, “Tunnel Vision.” Summer reading from Steve Slavin. American reality with a heart.

I ain’t no Robin Hood. Yeah, I do take from the rich and give to the poor, but I’m really in this just for myself. And let me level with you: I make out OK. In fact, more than OK.

***

(Photos c/o Marie Curie via Untapped Cities.)

Code 99

Pop Fiction

After 50 years of stagnation the American short story is changing. Stories now are expected to be entertaining– as they once were, incidentally. It’s the only way stories can compete in an increasingly noisy society with a myriad of choices.

That’s the premise, anyway, behind this website! Today we have a shoplifting story by James Guthrie, “Code 99,”   which is short and simple. We believe it’s also entertaining. As they say in the restaurant biz, enjoy!

“You,” the floorwalker shouted, pointing straight at me. “Let’s go.” And off he sprinted, assuming I was close behind.

 

 

Crash Tested

Pop Fiction

Dummies! No, we’re not talking about the nation’s political candidates. We refer to actual dummies– the crash test kind. (Quite appropriate, as this website is based in Detroit. Did we feed to our featured writer, Dave Petraglia, inside information?)

Petraglia’s story asks: What happens when a crash-test dummy desires a change? What kind of a change? Read “Crash Tested” and see. The story is very 2016!

In the process, Sean had skipped the childhood admonitions, the isolation and suffering, and found that in the catalog of human emotions and her reactions to them, she was not who she’d been molded to be.

(Artwork by Dave Petraglia.)

 

 

Rejects from the Pretzel Factory

Pop Fiction

With all of us bombarded by bad news from mainstream media on a daily basis, we at NEW POP decided it was time for some humor. After all, we advertise ourselves as the MF (More Fun) website. Sit back, turn off the world and read John Gorman’s “Rejects from the Pretzel Factory.” Humor with heart. But watch out for bad puns!

Has anyone done something so nice for you you’re mad as hell at them? You’re mad because you need to pay them back, not because they expect it, but to squish it from your conscience. After Nick ducktaped my knee at the factory he nursed me in an inexcusable way. He made my life rosier. He talked the head honchos into getting me to play Auntie Bloom, the fake founder of the pretzel franchise.

Minivan Vigilante

Pop Fiction

This is not a Thanksgiving story– not exactly anyway. It’s a story about junior high, and mothers and minivans, and other things. We think you’ll conclude after reading it that Laura Herrin’s “Minivan Vigilante” is an ideal story to read around the holidays.

There on the gym floor Bridgette Calhoun was lined up right next to Kate Carlson. Kate came home and locked herself in her room for days in a row before finally collapsing in Sue’s lap and spilling the saga of Bridgette’s cruelty.

Only in America

Pop Fiction

A different take on the American Dream from our previous story is Alan Swyer’s entertaining tale, “Only in America.” The mob meets high society. Who is Whitney St. Clair anyway? What is he doing, and why is he doing it? Find out!

Despite the fact that he could never quite shake the constant fear and trembling at 3 AM that his days as Whitney St. Clair might be numbered, the weeks that followed were a rollercoaster ride the likes of which the guy formerly known as Mickey Rose would never have even dared imagine.

Speech Therapy

Pop Fiction

Zombies!

A zombie story?

It was inevitable that at some point we would publish a zombie story. We want to be at the epicenter of the culture. Zombies are very “pop” right now. Very in. Far be it from NEW POP LIT to miss out on a trend!

“Speech Therapy” by Heidi Nibbelink might be the strangest story we’ve ever presented. It might be the most hilarious. (Speech therapy for zombies?) You the reader must judge. Plunge into the story here.  But be cautious! Be forewarned. Be sure to wear latex gloves as you take the narrative journey.

Soon my schedule was booked for nine hours a day with all-zombie clients. I started running evening conversation groups two nights a week where those who graduated from my ten-week course could continue practicing and refining their skills. And the money!

 

 

The Double

Pop Fiction

Hello! We’re back to posting short fiction, which is our main purpose. We seek to present stories that are readable, compelling, and well-written. We have one! The question you must ask yourself about this tale is this: is it genre or is it literature? (This is a question John Colapinto addressed for us in his recent interview.) We’re of a mind that fiction can and should be both. Doppelgangers in particular have been used in fiction by talented pop-lit writers from Edgar Allan Poe to Fyodor Dostoevsky to Joseph Conrad. (Do we believe Nels Hanson is in sterling company? Yes.)

Read Mr. Hanson’s deep, noirish tale “The Double” and see what you think.

I was dead. I lay on the cold pebbles. The water flowed over me. With drowned eyes I saw the stars flicker like wet candles past the dark surface of the creek.