Defining the Future of Literature

Announcement

–of the story, the periodical, the book.

The way to do that is to transform the literary art and the presentation of that art. Which we’ve begun doing, including with our first released zeen, Extreme Zeen. Now available here to purchase. 

WHY is this publication an important step in the transformation process? 

Not everyone will “get” it, but the clues are in the publication itself– pointing the direction for us. And, we believe, for writing and for books themselves. Which in ten years won’t resemble what the mainstream publishes now.

ez cover on red - Edited

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(Art: “Woman with Birds” by Alexandra Ekster.)

A Story: Poetry or Prose?

Pop Lit Fiction

FUSING FORMS

AS our last feature in April we present writing from rising young literary star Aaron H. Aceves which opens with a poem in the narrator’s head– then tells the story behind the poem. The story involves a woman, but is also about the setting. A club, in downtown Los Angeles, and the people occupying it– and the feeling evoked, within the narrator and inside us. 

A story? A poem? A painting? Read “The Look” and judge for yourself.

I watched her watching them for a while. I could have watched her all night long.

Long, shiny hair. Flawless skin. Winged eyeliner. A boyfriend.

I have a thing for unavailable women.

marc chagall the soldier drinks

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(Art: “L’Equipe de Cardiff” by Robert Delaunay; “The Soldier Drinks” by Marc Chagall.)

More April Poetry!

Poetry

SNOW IN APRIL?

THE QUESTION BECAME, when we accepted two poems from Erin Knowles Chapman for the Poetry Month of April, “How to finesse a poem about snow which is being published in April?”

Fortunately, nature and Michigan’s always-unpredictable weather came through for us with three inches of snow this past Friday. There you have it. Proof! Sometimes it snows, in Michigan, in April.

Anyway, we give you the reader two new poems by Erin Chapman which are reader-friendly, thought-provoking, mood-invoking, entertaining– if not exactly topical and timely, other than being poetry presented in the poetry month of April. We trust you’ll enjoy them.

What needs to be done

Is attainable here, a way of earning more time

Alone. (Their home is really her home.)

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(Art: “Watercolor Landscape” by John Marin.)

Easter Fiction 2020

Classic Pop

THE THEME OF RESURRECTION

Many authors have pursued the theme of resurrection/rebirth over the years, notably Alexandre Dumas in his famous novel The Count of Monte Cristo. None were more relentless in that pursuit than the man known as O. Henry— probably because his own life was an example of same.

For this Easter we present an O. Henry classic, The Church with an Overshot-Wheel.

Thus, in memory of Aglaia, the old mill was converted into a blessing for the community in which she had once lived. It seemed that the brief life of the child had brought about more good than the three score years and ten of many. But Abram Strong set up yet another monument to her memory.

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(Art: “Madonna of the Lilies” by Alphonse Mucha.)

Poetry Month 2020

Poetry

DOES THE WORLD NEED POETRY?

The world right now more than ever needs poetry! We all need a few timeless bards speaking universal truths to take us away from those ills that– literally– plague us.

Today we present one of the best in the person of Frank D. Walsh, who’s been for decades an iconic figure on Philadelphia’s poetry scene. More than this, no one anywhere is a more dedicated student of the craft of, nor fiercer advocate of the necessity for, the magical musical undefinable phenomenon known as poetry.

We’re fortunate to present at this site a fragment of one of his works– “Spectre of the Rose”— BUT, you’ll be pleased to know, we’ll soon, perhaps in a couple weeks, be presenting more of it, inside a demo of a lit journal/print zine hybrid we call a “zeen.” Stay tuned for that. In the interim, dive into Walsh’s poetry. . . .

I have raked in your ashes
from the kiln of love gone cold
and dared your thorns,
and whirlwind of lips but
the gun sounded or time summoned
me to the arcade of its shrine;
still you arranged sanctuary for my kind.

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ALSO, check out our new “Pop Quiz” Q & A, this one with talented young writer Fran-Claire Kenney. We’re out to locate and spotlight new literary talent before anyone else.
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(Art: “The Bard” by Thomas Jones.)

Classic Pop

Classic Pop

CLASSIC SHORT STORY LITERARY ART

Someone referred to our recent presentation of an Edgar Allan Poe plague story as “old pop lit.” Well, it is. Writers should recognize the history of their art. We recognize the history of pop literature. In particular, the pop short story, which long before hit records became the rage was the popular American art form.

HOW did it become that?

Because short story writers were able to make an emotional connection with readers, in the same way pop singers today make an emotional connection with their fans.

One of the masters of the American short story was Poe. Another was the man known as O. Henry, who during his brief career became the most popular story writer of them all.

One of O. Henry’s masterpieces is “The Last Leaf,”  which we present, in these challenging times, as our feature. The tale is about disease sweeping through a city– but it’s also about love, friendship, and hope. 

The setting? A bohemian neighborhood in New York. The characters? Two young artists and an older artist who lives beneath them. All are participants in that era’s version of the gig economy– and so are uniquely vulnerable to the hostile swings of misfortune. As fragile humanity is vulnerable, in our time, or in any time.

In November a cold, unseen stranger, whom the doctors called. Pneumonia, stalked about the colony, touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Over on the east side this ravager strode boldly, smiting his victims by scores, but his feet trod slowly through the maze of the narrow and moss-grown “places.”

George_Bellows_-_New_York

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(Art: “Park Street Church in Winter” by Arthur Clifton Goodwin; “New York” by George Bellows.)

The Last Party?

Pop Lit Fiction

ON CORONAS AND CONTAGIOUS MUSIC

Today is St. Patrick’s Day, but it’s an unusual St. Paddy’s Day because of the fear the hysteria the caution protection prevention over a bug, so the parades are fewer, the parties calmer, celebration muted. This year. Unless there’s a final wild-and-masque’d Edgar Poe blowout someplace. 

APPROPRIATE then that we have as our new feature a short story, “Townies” by Philip Charter, about six friends traveling to Majorca to party. And party they do.

But what awaits them?

A contagion, yes, but a contagion of a different sort. Not a virus, but having something to do with music and sex.

READ IT! drink it inhale it as you quarantine yourself against the onslaughts of panic and madness.

Within one minute of Gavin fading in the music, the dance floor was covered. It was as if the beat was ripping girls out of their seats, me included. The boys of course followed.

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(Painting: “Party” by Emil Nolde.)

Poe’s “Masque”

Classic Pop

Everyone is talking about it so we thought we’d post it– one of the best short stories ever written, “Masque of the Red Death” by that master of pop writing, Edgar Allan Poe

The abbey was amply provisioned. With such precautions the courtiers might bid defiance to contagion. The external world could take care of itself. In the meantime it was folly to grieve or to think. 

Strangely enough, our previous feature story, “Cracks by Wilson Koewing, was about masks (at Mardis Gras), and our next feature– due next week, by Philip Charter— is about partying. A different sort of partying– or is it? 

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(Painting: “Soldier at a Game of Chess” by Jean Metzinger.)

Talent Search 2020

Announcement

WHO ARE THE BEST NEW WRITERS?

We are going on a more relaxed posting schedule in the next so-many weeks, so we can focus on our behind-the-scenes activities.

Which include:

-Creating a few print-zeen prototypes. The most ambitious aspect of the New Pop Lit project.

-Further development of our version of the “3-D” multidimensional story.

-Increased emphasis on locating striking new writing talent– with the proviso that talent isn’t enough. We seek ability to adapt to our artistic ideas of pop clarity and energy, as well as charismatic attributes.

Will we be staging an “NPL Combine” to access the best indie writers on today’s literary scene? Possibly!

We’re looking for the Billie Eilish of the literary world. Talent and pop attitude. If you’re that person, get in touch!

portrait-of-jean-metzinger-robert-delaunay 1906

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IN THE MEANTIME, we have much terrific writing upcoming– including a new fiction feature, more “Pop Quiz” Q & A’s, and for April, poetry and poetry-themed prose for this year’s Poetry Month. THEN, more excellent fiction. Not to miss.

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(Art: “The Bach Singer” by Johannes Itten; “Portrait of Jean Metzinger” by Robert Delaunay.)

Literary Opinion

book review, Opinion

OUR OP-ED PAGE RETURNS

We are a free speech literary site. Which means an ability and willingness to express dissenting opinions. This includes dissenting opinions about literature.

TODAY we bring back our opinion page as an outlet, we hope, for a variety of opinions and criticism from all directions about today’s literary world and the products of that world. Starting with a biting review by G.D. Dess of Ben Lerner’s much-hyped novel, The Topeka School.

Holden’s voice echoes in your mind long after you put down the novel, whereas Adam’s voice becomes inaudible the minute you turn the last page.

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(Art: “Brooklyn Bridge” by Joseph Stella, created 100 years ago.)