Valentine’s 2021

Poetry

LOVE PROSE/POETRY

WITH all the hating going on right now coming in from every direction, the universe could use more love.

Positive loving vibes issuing forth into the atmosphere to transform one and all.

With this in mind we offer before St. Valentine’s Day six love poems by Toronto musician/writer Tom Preisler. They well cover the inevitable ups and downs which come with loving someone.

(Tom will be featured in an upcoming print publication of ours, Extreme Zeen 2, due in April. We’ll also have a photo of him in our next print zeen, due soon. We like to spotlight the best new writers, and Tom Preisler is a good one.)

There is this loneliness everywhere,

You can see it in the front door of a supermarket store, its reflecting in your beer and untouched whisky,

It’s in the face of a woman waiting for a telephone call that never comes, in a one bedroom apartment with plastic flowers in waterless vase, untouched, unloved,
faithfully waiting for each night to pass.

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(Art: “The Dancer” by Andre Derain.)

Are Fast Food Poems Pop?

Poetry

DILEMMAS OF CORPORATE CULTURE

ARE fast food poems pop? Or art? Andy Warhol would argue they’re the essence of pop art.

Corporate culture is ubiquitous and it’s also America’s addition to the culture of the world. Coca-Cola wasn’t simply a brand. It advertised American populist ideology to the planet. Some might call it cultural imperialism and others would say it’s only a soft drink.

Jimmy John’s is just a sandwich.

Where do we draw the line? Is the intersection of art and commerce allowable? The bigger question: Is it avoidable?

Our take: If a competing literary site can dedicate their entire oeuvre and reason-for-being to a fast food taco chain, then we can present three terrific prose poems about Jimmy John’s.

Chelsea Sieg is one of the best young writers we’ve come across in a while. A writer with the rare ability to combine humor and poignancy with a perfect flow of words so that afterward you shake your head at the accomplishment. Three prose poems: “The Jimmy John’s Poem Collection.” Read them.

it was a simple, quiet, two am kind of happiness, the kind you don’t have to think that hard about. it was a small, soft hope. and I would have eaten every sandwich on the goddamn menu, mustard and all, to keep it alive.

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(Art: “Still LIfe with a Beer Mug” by Fernand Leger.)

Murder Ballads: New Poetry

Poetry

HALLOWEEN draws closer! So today we present at least one poem with a Halloween theme, along with another that’s creepy, and a third which, well, you’ll have to read it. The feature is titled “Life of Murder Ballads and Other Poems” and the poet is John Tustin. Please enjoy.

Living my night of murder ballads, Frankenstein’s Monster
And the poetry of Poe
While you imagine your heart rests in black lipstick and torn fishnet hose.

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(Art: “I Love Eva” by Pablo Picasso.)

Mystic Hunt for Better Poetry

Poetry

We’re on a mystic hunt for better everything, including better language, better writing, better art. Are those unicorns which don’t exist– or can they exist with the right drive, plans, imagination? Latest in our quest is a poem by Chris Vola, “Impractical Taxidermy.” His view of the world and this crazy society encompasses plants, personas, rap, bulldogs, video chat, Whole Foods– and a whole lot else. We think you’ll enjoy it.

your eyes as downtrodden

as my social media presence

frozen fingernails waiting to flatten me

like last birthday’s Perrier-Jouët

against the darkening pavement

<<<<>>>>

(Art: “Mystic Hunt of the Unicorn” by Martin Schongauer.)

Summer Love: Poetry by Holly Day

Poetry

ANOTHER TALENTED ZEENITH WRITER

Holly Day is one of the poets featured in ZEENITH (available here).

How talented a poet is she?

We now have three other poems of hers readily available to read at our site: “Summer Love and Other Poems.”

They show a wide variety of themes. Each of them give a piece of a picture of the crazy sad beautiful world we live in now, and so their overall effect, one might say, is three-dimensional. Worth reading, if you love summer, love life, love words:

I hear radio reports reporting, television shows broadcasting
school janitors with secret torture chambers
and I wonder how they can ask me

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(Art: “Composition V” by Wassily Kandinsky.)

Three Pandemic Poems

Poetry

INCLUDING “I’M NOT GOING TO MAKE YOU SICK”

THE ONLY good thing which can be said about a pandemic– there’ve been many over the centuries– is that it occasionally inspires or encourages due to lockdowns the creation of great art. Has any been created during this pandemic, this lockdown?

We have three very good poems by L.A. poet Luis Cuauhtemoc Berriozabal, which capture the reality of life in America now. Worth reading.

I see Gary for the first
time since the pandemic.
He is still living
in the streets,
looking a little
less disheveled.
He tells me Luis,
can you help me
out with some money
to get a coffee,
some sugar, or
a cigar? I’m not
going to make you
sick, I promise.

***

ALSO, don’t forget to purchase a copy of Extreme Zeen at our POP SHOP .
(Another high quality, hand-crafted print journal is in development as I type this.)

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(Art: “The Fifth Plague of Egypt” by Joseph M.W. Turner, and “The Triumph of Death” by Pieter Bruegel.)

More April Poetry!

Poetry

SNOW IN APRIL?

THE QUESTION BECAME, when we accepted two poems from Erin Knowles Chapman for the Poetry Month of April, “How to finesse a poem about snow which is being published in April?”

Fortunately, nature and Michigan’s always-unpredictable weather came through for us with three inches of snow this past Friday. There you have it. Proof! Sometimes it snows, in Michigan, in April.

Anyway, we give you the reader two new poems by Erin Chapman which are reader-friendly, thought-provoking, mood-invoking, entertaining– if not exactly topical and timely, other than being poetry presented in the poetry month of April. We trust you’ll enjoy them.

What needs to be done

Is attainable here, a way of earning more time

Alone. (Their home is really her home.)

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(Art: “Watercolor Landscape” by John Marin.)

Poetry Month 2020

Poetry

DOES THE WORLD NEED POETRY?

The world right now more than ever needs poetry! We all need a few timeless bards speaking universal truths to take us away from those ills that– literally– plague us.

Today we present one of the best in the person of Frank D. Walsh, who’s been for decades an iconic figure on Philadelphia’s poetry scene. More than this, no one anywhere is a more dedicated student of the craft of, nor fiercer advocate of the necessity for, the magical musical undefinable phenomenon known as poetry.

We’re fortunate to present at this site a fragment of one of his works– “Spectre of the Rose”— BUT, you’ll be pleased to know, we’ll soon, perhaps in a couple weeks, be presenting more of it, inside a demo of a lit journal/print zine hybrid we call a “zeen.” Stay tuned for that. In the interim, dive into Walsh’s poetry. . . .

I have raked in your ashes
from the kiln of love gone cold
and dared your thorns,
and whirlwind of lips but
the gun sounded or time summoned
me to the arcade of its shrine;
still you arranged sanctuary for my kind.

****

ALSO, check out our new “Pop Quiz” Q & A, this one with talented young writer Fran-Claire Kenney. We’re out to locate and spotlight new literary talent before anyone else.
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(Art: “The Bard” by Thomas Jones.)

Poetry in Nature

Poetry

NEW POETRY 2020

POETS traditionally have written about their relationship with nature– undoubtedly because it’s when we’re in nature, communing with the actual world, that the music of poetry comes naturally into our heads. The oldest art? The art most attuned to the rhythms of the world and the universe. Or the mind of the universe.

Our first poetry feature of the new decade spotlights that relationship: “Into the Depths of the Trees”  by C.A. Shoultz. We hope you like it.

I wandered further, past the noise of cars,

Until great silence came around my ears,

And I could feel the hairs raise on my neck. . .

NataliaGoncharovaTheForest

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(Featured art: “The Park at Carrieres-Saint-Denis” by Georges Braque; “The Forest” by Natalia Goncharova.)

Tornadoes and Other Fronts

Feature, Poetry

A POP LIT POTPOURRI 

We’re out to create literary tornadoes. Toward that end we point the reader to three new-or-recent posts at this project.

FIRST we have a new feature, “Tornado Country” by poet John Grey. Two very good poems for your reading pleasure.

and cars, long and proud and American made

explode like firecrackers in the heat of day,

and some small town like Millville is razed like it’s Babylon,

SECOND, we did a short “Pop Quiz” Q & A with the author of our previous feature, Transhumanist Presidential candidate Rachel Haywire

THIRD, a return of our NPL News blog with a quick look at Lana DelRey and a possible? connection to future literary stars, “Reverse Jekyll and Hyde.”

Must reading to stay current with the Pop Lit literary scene.
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(Art: “Tornado Over Kansas” by John Steuart Curry.)