Classic Pop

Classic Pop

CLASSIC SHORT STORY LITERARY ART

Someone referred to our recent presentation of an Edgar Allan Poe plague story as “old pop lit.” Well, it is. Writers should recognize the history of their art. We recognize the history of pop literature. In particular, the pop short story, which long before hit records became the rage was the popular American art form.

HOW did it become that?

Because short story writers were able to make an emotional connection with readers, in the same way pop singers today make an emotional connection with their fans.

One of the masters of the American short story was Poe. Another was the man known as O. Henry, who during his brief career became the most popular story writer of them all.

One of O. Henry’s masterpieces is “The Last Leaf,”  which we present, in these challenging times, as our feature. The tale is about disease sweeping through a city– but it’s also about love, friendship, and hope. 

The setting? A bohemian neighborhood in New York. The characters? Two young artists and an older artist who lives beneath them. All are participants in that era’s version of the gig economy– and so are uniquely vulnerable to the hostile swings of misfortune. As fragile humanity is vulnerable, in our time, or in any time.

In November a cold, unseen stranger, whom the doctors called. Pneumonia, stalked about the colony, touching one here and there with his icy fingers. Over on the east side this ravager strode boldly, smiting his victims by scores, but his feet trod slowly through the maze of the narrow and moss-grown “places.”

George_Bellows_-_New_York

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(Art: “Park Street Church in Winter” by Arthur Clifton Goodwin; “New York” by George Bellows.)

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